One week in Hong Kong

Hong Kong has been towards the top of my list of places to visit for a long time, not for the usual cultural travel motives or blade runner style references, but largely influenced by my teen years watching endless camera reviews on Youtube by DigitalRev TV. In these reviews they would test cameras on Hong Kong’s streets, the bustling city I saw on screen got me thinking about the photographic possibilities all those years ago. This month I was fortunate enough to visit for a short time whilst shooting time-lapse sequences for an upcoming project.

On paper Hong Kong wouldn’t be my kind of place; it’s incredibly commercial, dense, hectic, noisy and smelly at times, however, it seems to have a certain film-set like charm that makes me want to go back. As a British citizen Hong Kong’s recent British colonial history adds another layer of interest to an already dynamic city for me. European architectural fragments hint to it’s past, as do the more obvious place names like “Queen Victoria Street”. What really fascinated me about this city though, was the abrupt transition from urban to nature, from skyscrapers to lush forests. Unlike most cities, HK doesn’t have the usual sprawl from Central to inner city to suburbs. Just walk up any of the high sided peaks that surround HK, you’ll enter tropical forests and feel very far away from all the McDonalds and Traffic you’ve just left behind.

One week in Hong Kong

Hong Kong has been towards the top of my list of places to visit for a long time, not for the usual cultural travel motives or blade runner style references, but largely influenced by my teen years watching endless camera reviews on Youtube by DigitalRev TV. In these reviews they would test cameras on Hong Kong’s streets, the bustling city I saw on screen got me thinking about the photographic possibilities all those years ago. This month I was fortunate enough to visit for a short time whilst shooting time-lapse sequences for an upcoming project.

On paper Hong Kong wouldn’t be my kind of place; it’s incredibly commercial, dense, hectic, noisy and smelly at times, however, it seems to have a certain film-set like charm that makes me want to go back. As a British citizen Hong Kong’s recent British colonial history adds another layer of interest to an already dynamic city for me. European architectural fragments hint to it’s past, as do the more obvious place names like “Queen Victoria Street”. What really fascinated me about this city though, was the abrupt transition from urban to nature, from skyscrapers to lush forests. Unlike most cities, HK doesn’t have the usual sprawl from Central to inner city to suburbs. Just walk up any of the high sided peaks that surround HK, you’ll enter tropical forests and feel very far away from all the McDonalds and Traffic you’ve just left behind.